FAQ

/FAQ

A home inspection is a professional, complete visual examination of all the systems and physical structural elements of a home. Our emphasis is on identifying existing or potential problems that would affect a purchasers buying decision.

A home is the largest purchase most people will ever make. It only makes sense to find out as much as you can about the house you are interested in before you buy. That way you can avoid costly surprise repairs and problems with your new home. Our report will also advise you of what maintenance is required to keep your home in top condition.

A professional inspection will give you a clear picture of the many systems and structural elements that make up the property. If you are selling your home, a pre-listing inspection will point out any potential problems that might be uncovered later by the buyers inspector. Finding them early will allow you to address them before listing your home, making for a faster and smoother sale.

Call up and ask about their credentials and experience. If for some reason you don’t feel comfortable asking this of the inspector when speaking with them on the phone then how will you feel asking questions at the inspection? You must feel that the inspector is qualified, experienced and attentive of your needs.

Most inspections take about two to three hours. These times may vary depending on the size, age, & condition of the home.

Absolutely. A professional inspection of a new home is important. We can spot potential problems early, while they are still easy to correct. It is especially valuable to arrange an inspection before the interior walls are finished. As building professionals, we may find problem areas where the builder has taken shortcuts or not done good work.

A complete home inspection, after the Certificate of Occupancy (C.O.) is issued, and with time remaining prior to closing, is recommended in order to uncover any defects and allow time for the builder to remedy them prior to closing. Major defects do not belong on a “punch-list” to be fixed after you own the home. “Punch-lists” should be used for minor and/or cosmetic items only.

This is the biggest mistake many potential new homeowners make when purchasing a home. Although the person you are considering may be very skilled, they are not trained or experienced at professional home inspections. Professional home inspection is a unique skill like no other. Professional inspectors get what we call an inspector’s instinct for problems. That instinct takes extensive training and lots of experience doing inspections to develop. Many contractors, and other trades professionals hire a professional home inspector to inspect their homes when they make a purchase.

Our report will tell you the condition of the house, including needed repairs and suggested improvements. No house is going to be perfect. It is up to you to decide how any problems the inspection uncovers might affect your decision to purchase. If major problems are discovered, you may want to try negotiating with the seller to have them repaired before closing the deal. Or perhaps the seller will lower the price, or offer more favorable contract terms. In the end, the decision rests with you, but knowing about potential problems, before you buy, gives you the power to negotiate and make the best decisions.

No. The code of ethics of the State of New Jersey prohibits its licensees from doing repair work on properties they inspect. This assures that there will never be any conflict of interest by the inspector. Our purpose is to provide an unbiased, objective third party report on the condition of the home.

No. ASHI is a fine organization of home inspectors. However, there are several other home inspector organizations that are nationally recognized and serve their members and public equally as well as ASHI. I choose to belong to the International Association of Certified Home Inspectors(NACHI), which is the largest home inspector organization with a dedicated membership committed to supporting its fellow members through sharing of experiences, education, training and other areas. Each organization has its own standards of practice, but, as a NJ licensed Home Inspector, I am required to follow the NJ Standards of Practice, which is very similar to the NACHI and ASHI standards. NACHI also has a local chapter that serves southern New Jersey with monthly meetings and continuing education seminars(which are license requirements).

You can call us and discuss all the aspects of your new home whenever you like. Our service is a long-term investment.